Bruxas – Más Profundo [DKMNTL049]

I tried to catch Bruxas’ Más Profundo when it first came out in June, but it had already eluded me. This week, Dekmantel have pressed another batch of this transatlantic gem, a balearic Lusophone disco hybrid that is already going down as one of the best releases of the year.

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Title track Más Profundo recalls Ibiza beach whispers in sultry Portuguese female vox reels. This track, like the rest of the EP, manages to build itself around balearic sensibilities without ever dropping the tempo. Tropical birds perch on synthesisers; nature floats by in 4/4 time.  Sizzling, swirling and psychedelic, by the time it fades out, you wish it could go on forever.

Luckily, Tropicaçovas kicks it up a notch with the filthiest rhythm section this side of Bahia. Bruxas marry these traditional elements of Lusophone dance music with classic disco-era keys and arpeggiators to dazzling effect.

On the flip, Selva Cósmica stomps and trips along under Baldelli-style synthscapes, whisking you to the darkest of leaf-strewn Amazonian hideaways. Finally, Plantas Falsas digs into a cunning nu-disco workout as the sun drops low.

In 25 minutes of fuzzy balearic disco bliss, ‘Más Profundo’ sums up the entire 45turns ethos. An essential of 2017.

You can pick up ‘Más Profundo’ on 12″ vinyl at Dekmantel. Also like 45turns on Facebook for tons more next-level wax. 

 

Common Edits 012 [CE-012]

Common Edits are a label from Canada entirely dedicated to the art of the edit. As the name suggests, they only release edits, and every time they do, they throw a massive party.

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If you find yourself in Edmonton, Canada this October, there’s a definite party going down.

As A1, ‘How About’, shows, Common edits goes beyond the standard chop and smash usually needed to constitute an edit these days. It’s an electro-boogie beast that flits around the room in an orange burning light, but never veers off track.

Eddie C, known for his Latin-themed work on labels like Barefoot Beats, stays true to his style and delivers an airy,  downtempo rework of some tasteful Brazilian jazz ballad.

‘Space Up Your Life’ is swirling New York disco-funk with all the slap bass and filter fun you could want on one quarter of a 12” plastic disc.

One can only imagine where ‘Sunny Days in The Chocolate Factory’ came from- it reminds me of Disco Halal’s Brazilian outings, dark, pulsating undercurrents somehow meshing with breezy, tripped out guitars. At some points you could even be on Kraftwerk’s Autobahn- like being thrown out into the atmosphere, disengaged completely yet fixated on a single star while the slow mass of existence moves around it. The 45turns tip.

These Common edits tend not to be so common, so get it from your local vinyl dealer, record shop or online outlet ASAP. 

Jaz – Geisha (Passport To Paradise)

Our good friends at Passport to Paradise continue their winning streak with an exclusive release from man of the cloth, digger extraordinaire, John Zahl / Jaz. If you’ve seen his video for Thump, you’ll know that Jaz and his works are weird, wrong and wonderful: in a word, the ethos of PTP is alive and kicking in this release.

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First up, Geisha chugs along in the cosmic dust of 80s synth assortments and flourishes of koto. Scatter-brained brilliance from the deepest of Osaka basements. A2, Move to the Beach, heralds a sleeker, sleazier side to Jaz’s episcopal offering. It builds itself out from a latent groove that ushers in the end of the night, carrying you to the empty seafront just before dawn, where a breeze ruffles the palm trees as you dig your eyes into the moon.

Turning the page, we have a rework from the same post-Kraftwerk heritage, but this one is more potent synthpop roller, a straight-up, no frills edit for the toughest of dance floors. The final track, Twin Theory, is a lofty affair from the outset, its arpeggiated bass holding the track to ransom: it is playful yet very serious, sublime and sarcastic. This is what PTP are bringing to your homes and dancefloors.

Check out Geisha over at Juno, where you’ll find the rest of PTP’s excellent releases.

Lost Propert Edits Volume 4

The mysterious Lost Property imprint returns for another round of enigmatic disco edits.

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‘Ganu Ganu’ is a sweeping, swirling belter of a track that chugs along with dizzying industrial intensity. Perfect for midnight temperature rising . A2, ‘Financial Times Dub’, pulls back a little for a smooth, sunny disco-funk escapade.

‘Don’t Come Runnin’, on the flip, has that rising bassline stomp characteristic of the Lost Property edits. It’s flecked with jazz sensibilities and a female soul vocal track. The last track, ‘Princess of Persia’, is a straight-up headmash conga brass party with a Middle Eastern vibe – the 45turns tip.

Overall, a serious set of edits from a consistently solid imprint, which may or may not be PBR Streetgang in disguise.

They don’t have a website, but you can order Lost Property Volume 4 at Juno.

Les Yeux Orange – Togosava (Good Plus)

The two releases so far on Les Yeux Orange’s Good Plus imprint have proved as evasive as they are killer. This month, Good Plus have resurfaced for the second time this year with ‘Togosava’, three characteristically killer afrodisco edits.

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‘Avidio’, spanning the entire A-side, is an atmospheric mid-tempo disco chugger with a swinging groove. It’s really nice, but the flip side is where the action is.

‘Yanga Mbiwaa’ is a lurching afrodisco monster that rises up with West African chants and juicy bass before throwing you off the trail with dissonant guitar, double-stops and key changes, making it all the sweeter when it does lock in to the groove.

‘Autoradio’, spins you around the eternal ephemeral, a hurricane of formalities, where bright alto sax ponders the point of going, moving, introducing and asking..It’s dark, decadent and bouncy, and the 45turns favourite. Listen to it below.

You might be able to buy Togosava on Les Yeux Orange’s Bandcamp page, if you keep your eyes peeled.

DISCO EDITS: SHMLL – OYE Edits 05 (OYE Records)

Berlin-based duo SHMLL serve up four sweet space-tastic disco cuts for the fifth editon of OYE Edits.

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Having previously put out left-of-centre releases from the likes of Jonny Rock and DJ Uffe, the fifth 12″ in the edition stays true to the OYE formula – or lack of it. A whacked out synth-guitar mutant screams to the heavens above a juicy locked groove on ‘Andong’, and ‘Arnis’ brings the dark Middle Eastern vibes to the fore in a semitonic work-out that wouldn’t be amiss on Disco Halal.

 

The flip side is full of spacey percussive headmashery for restless feet and half-open eyes, a tribal call and response to mirror your inner circuit trip into discoid overload.

Disclaimer: nobody knows where this source material came from. It may not exist in any knowable form.

Get OYE Edits 06 now at OYE Records or any decent purveyor of vinyl. 


For more international feel disco edits, check out the Korean cuts on Jongno Edits Vol. 5.

Marcos Valle – Marcos Valle (Preservation Norway)

Norwegian reissue crew Preservation Records have brought out Marcos Valle’s eponymous 1983 album (his 12th), now on vinyl for the first time ever.

As any YouTube disco surfer will know, ‘Estrelar’, the opening track, is a killer disco/boogie cut. The funky verse breaks are bolstered by a transcendent pop hook, elevating the song if only to break it back down in disco slap-bass euphoria.

Although the musicians on this record shine on feel-good, brass-heavy disco cuts like ‘Estrelar’ and ‘Dia D’, the synth-textured grooves found on popular Brazilian tune ‘Samba de Verão’ or ‘Naturalmente’ stay firmly put on the beach at sunset.

On tracks like ‘Para Os Fillhos de Abraão’, Valle gets himself into full Beach Boys pop crooner mode, complete with full band harmonies. There’s as many hooks as conga hits, just one of the reason why this a very special crossover album.

Valle is an extremely versatile singer, knowing how to work the inexplicable charm that Brazilian Portuguese has over pop ballads. He reaches out beyond the overdone disco formula and saccharine piano ballads common to lots of 80s Brazilian music. As a player on the album himself, this must have been important for Valle in his exposition .

The reissue of Marcos Valle’s eponymous album is available now at Preservation Records. Dig it.


If, like us, you have an appetite for soul and disco reissues from 1983, check out Letta Mbulu’s In The Music The Village Never Ends.